Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways


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At this time, blood lead level screening and testing rates are well below what the Division of Public Health would expect them to be based upon the risk factors that determine when screening or testing is necessary. This bill simplifies the requirements and the process for healthcare providers and eliminates confusion that may be causing the low compliance rate for screening or testing, and defines terms used in the Act.

This bill mandates screening, defined as capillary blood test, at 12 and 24 months of age. The bill clarifies insurance coverage for the costs of compliance with the Act. The Division of Public Health is also directed to report on elevated blood lead levels to the General Assembly annually and to develop regulations to implement and enforce the Act within 12 months of being enacted. This bill changes the relationship between physicians and physician assistants from supervisory to collaborative, in recognition of the evolving role of physician assistants and reflecting the education, training, and experience required for licensing, which emphasizes the team-based practice model.

The bill retains a ratio of physician assistants to physicians, unless a regulation of the Board increases or decreases the number. This limit of does not apply to physicians and physician assistants who practice in the same physical office or facility building, such as an emergency department.

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This bill increases the number of Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline members from 16 to 18, to include two physician assistant members appointed by the Regulatory Council for Physician Assistants. The bill authorizes physician assistants to participate as uncompensated volunteers in public or community events. This bill creates certificates of rehabilitation, an essential resource states can offer to support reentry, and promote public safety, by lifting statutory bars to jobs, licenses or other necessities such as housing that result from a conviction history.

Certificates may be used to provide a way for qualified people with criminal records to demonstrate rehabilitation or a commitment to rehabilitation. At least six states currently have laws authorizing certificates of rehabilitation or other similar means of removing legal barriers arising from a criminal record separate and apart from seeking a governor pardon.

This bill creates certificates of rehabilitation to restore the rights of people with criminal records who have paid their debt to society. This Act, the Psychology Interjurisdictional Compact PSYPACT , is an interstate compact designed to facilitate the practice of telepsychology and the temporary in-person, face-to-face practice of psychology across state boundaries.

This Act establishes standards for data security for Title 18 licensees and standards for the investigation of and notification to the Commissioner of a cybersecurity event affecting Title 18 licensees. The Program will be administered by the Delaware Health Care Commission in order to provide reinsurance to health insurance carriers that offer individual health benefit plans in Delaware.

The Program will be funded with pass-through funds received from the federal government under the Affordable Care Act, funds provided by the Federal Government for reinsurance, and through a 2. This Act exempts healthcare provider services subject to the Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act from the provisions of Subchapter II of Chapter 23 of Title 19 because these services are required by federal law and not elective under this subchapter.

This exemption was removed by error in by House Bill No. The Program will be funded with passthrough funds received from the federal government under the Affordable Care Act, funds provided by the Federal Government for reinsurance, and through a 2. PBMs serve as intermediaries between health plans, pharmaceutical manufacturers and pharmacies, and PBMs establish networks for consumers to receive reimbursement for drugs. Given the scope of PBMs in the healthcare delivery system, this Act is designed to provide enhanced oversight and transparency as it relates PBMs.

In addition, this Act updates existing law regarding maximum allowable cost lists and establishes a more transparent appeals process for a pharmacy to rely on if a PBM does not reimburse the pharmacy the amount owed under their contract or the maximum allowable cost list.

Appendix A: State Truck Size and Weight Laws

Finally, this Act makes technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual. HA 1 1 Clarifies that this Act does not apply to plans of health insurance or health benefits designed for issuance to persons eligible for coverage under Medicare, Medicaid, or any other similar coverage under a State or federal government plan. This avoids the need for the Code Revisors to redesignate the conflicting Code sections. This Act also prohibits a pharmacy benefits manager from reimbursing a pharmacist or pharmacy for a prescription drug or pharmacy service in an amount less than the pharmacy benefits manager reimburses itself or an affiliate for the same prescription drug or pharmacy service.

This Act, the Art Therapist Reimbursement Act, expands consumers' access to mental health care by designating licensed professional art therapists as reimbursement-eligible under health insurance contracts in this State. By assuring parity and equity in health care, this Act not only secures art therapy services for consumers, but operates to increase the number of licensed professional art therapists available in this State to advance the State's comprehensive behavioral health, trauma-responsive, early-intervention, and student success initiatives. This Act also allows licensed professional art therapists to provide art therapy services in various treatment settings to expand mental health access in this State.

This Act adds coverage for Medication Assisted Treatment "MAT" for drug and alcohol dependencies to the mental health parity laws for health insurance. This Act requires health insurance carriers to provide coverage for prescription medications approved by the U. Food and Drug Administration for MAT at no greater financial burden than for prescription medication for other illness or disease, without step therapy requirements, and at the lowest tier of the drug formulary. Enhance the ability to identify scope of service needs and gaps in services. Enhance the ability to leverage federal funds because past grant opportunities were denied, in part, because of a lack of reliable and useful Delaware data.

Incorporate the use of the data into research studies on the effectiveness of services provided, return on efforts, and cost-effectiveness. Gabapentin is a prescription medication which is used to treat partial seizures and neuropathic pain. However, Gabapentin is also used to increase the effects of opioids, which potentially increases the risk of overdose death when used in combination with opioids.

Gabapentin has become a drug of abuse with users reporting effects such as euphoria, a marijuana-like high, and other users describing their state after taking the medication to be zombie-like. The United States has seen substantial increases in the rate of Gabapentin prescribing and abuse.

Classifying Gabapentin as a Schedule V controlled substance in Delaware will permit the State to monitor the prescription of the drug and address issues of abuse. This Act gives the Delaware Secretary of State the authority to promulgate rules and regulations for the implementation of this Act. This Act prohibits a pelvic, rectal, or prostate examination by a health care practitioner or professional on an individual who is anesthetized or unconscious.

This Act provides exceptions and they are if informed consent is provided, the examination is for diagnostic or treatment purposes, an emergency exists and the examination is necessary, or the examination is ordered by a court. The Act also defines informed consent as a signing of a consent form that is written in plain language, is dated, includes a description of the procedure to be performed and states that a medical student or resident may perform or be present during the examination.

Finally, this Act provides that a health-care practitioner or professional who violates the section may be subject to discipline by the appropriate professional licensing board. This Amendment also provides an effective date which is 60 days after its enactment into law. This Act allows registered qualifying patients and registered designated caregivers to grow limited amounts of medical marijuana if the certain requirements are met.

This Act also gives the Department the authority to perform random inspections of home cultivation facilities and to require the production of the detailed monthly records. Unless there is credible reason to suspect a violation of this Act, the Department may only perform 2 inspections of the same location in a 12 month period. This Act also allows a landlord, homeowners association, or common interest communities to prohibit the cultivation of marijuana and requires that the annual report from the Medical Marijuana Act Oversight Committee provide data and recommendations regarding home cultivation of marijuana.

This bill requires criminal background checks for any current or prospective employees, contractors, and volunteers of the Division of Health and Social Services that visit families in their homes and in the community or have regular, direct access to children or adolescents under the age of This background check includes fingerprinting for Delaware and national background checks as well as a check of the Child Protection Registry.

This bill establishes a health care provider loan repayment program for qualifying primary care clinicians to be administered by the Delaware Health Care Commission. Hospitals that apply for grants on behalf of their qualifying clinicians must match the grant on a dollar-for-dollar basis. This Act makes compensation a mandatory subject of bargaining for any group of employees who have joined together for purposes of collective bargaining and certified a labor organization to serve as the group's exclusive collective bargaining representative.

This Act also eliminates any deadline for reaching an agreement pertaining to compensation. Finally, this Act repeals a portion of Section 8 of Chapter of Volume 81 of the Laws of Delaware, the Fiscal Year Budget Act, that pertains to the collective bargaining process repealed by Section 2 of this Act.

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This Act eliminates the set bargaining unit classifications established in 19 Del. It also eliminates the requirement that exclusive bargaining representatives of exclusive bargaining units form a coalition for collective bargaining. The Act eliminates the provision allowing for an employee organization to seek to be certified for unrepresented employees. The Act provides that parties may engage in collective bargaining for compensation in conjunction with or separately from collective bargaining for terms and conditions.

It requires that the negotiation of collective bargaining agreements be staggered over time while providing that collective bargaining agreements currently in place remain in place until they expire by their own terms. While the Act allows for exclusive representatives to bargain for different pay rate increases, it prohibits the compensation of bargaining units from exceeding the pay ranges for each pay grade as established each year in the appropriations act.

In addition, it retains the existing scope of bargaining contained in 19 Del. Section A a. Finally, this Act makes technical revisions to conform with the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual. This Act, modeled on similar laws in Virginia and Maryland, requires a health-care provider to provide notice to a patient at the time blood is drawn to perform a laboratory test for Lyme disease that explains the limitations of the test and instructs the patient to see their health-care provider if the patient continues to experience unexplained symptoms.

This Act is consumer and patient friendly. The use of genetic information in disqualifying coverage for non-health insurance products, such as disability insurance and long term care insurance, is a gap in the protection provided by the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. As a result, patients who seek genetic counseling to determine whether they may be at risk for certain diseases, such as genetic testing for the BRCA gene to determine predisposition for breast and prostate cancers, are cautioned that a positive result could result in the person being denied insurance.

The potential denial of insurance has a chilling effect on patients seeking genetic testing, blocking them from being proactive by putting in place a preventative care plan that would reduce the likelihood of them getting the specific disease in the future. This Act follows the lead of other states and prohibits discrimination based upon genetic characteristics and information in the issuance or renewal of disability and long term care insurance.

This Act also provides a notice requirement if an insurer requires a genetic test. This Act allows a patient to qualify for a valid registry identification card to purchase and use medical marijuana for any condition that a physician certifies that medical marijuana would likely provide a therapeutic or palliative benefit. This Act removes the requirement that only certain specialists may certify the use of medical marijuana if the patient is younger than 18 years old. This Act retains the requirement that qualifying patients younger than 18 years old may only receive marijuana oil.

This Substitute differs from Senate Bill No. To apply for a compassionate use card, this Substitute requires: 1. The physician must periodically re-evaluate the efficacy of the medical marijuana treatment. This Substitute also requires that a registry identification card state the type of card that is issued to clearly identify qualifying adult patients, qualifying pediatric patients, designated caregivers, and compassionate use patients.

SA 1 clarifies that the Department of Health and Social Services may establish intervals of different lengths for re-evaluation of the conditions for which a patient receives a compassionate use registry identification card. This Act restricts access to tobacco products and tobacco substitutes to individuals under age 21 by doing all of the following: 1.

Prohibits sales of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes to individuals who are under Imposes a civil penalty for sales to individuals between the ages of 18 and Repeals the ability of a parent or guardian to purchase tobacco products or tobacco substitutes for a minor. Revises the framework by which an employer may use an affirmative defense to the improper sale of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes, aligning the affirmative defense with the minimum age increase.

Adopts best practices for enforcement measures by modifying the prohibition against the purchase of tobacco products by minors. Prohibits individuals under age 21 from entering vapor establishments. SA 1 allows employees under age 21 who are employed by a vapor establishment on the effective date of this Act to continue working at the vapor establishment if the vapor establishment provides the required documentation to the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Enforcement.

This Amendment also makes this Act effective 90 days after enactment. SA 2 revises the definitions of "tobacco product" and "tobacco substitute" for clarity and makes corresponding changes to related statutes. Revises the definitions of "tobacco product" and tobacco substitute" for clarity and makes corresponding changes to related statutes. Allows employees under age 21 who are employed by a vapor establishment on the effective date of this Act to continue working at the vapor establishment if the vapor establishment provides the required documentation to the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Enforcement.

Makes this Act effective 90 days after enactment. Authorizes the direct care worker to do so. Prepackages the medication by date and time.


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Provides written instructions regarding the administration procedure. Enters into an agreement with a personal assistance services agency governing the administration of the medication by the direct care worker. This Act increases the penalties for parking in an area designated for a vehicle being used by an individual with a disability. The offenses subject to these increased penalties are included without change in lines 4 through 27 to add context. For a subsequent offense, this Act increases the potential minimum imprisonment from 10 days to 15 days and the potential maximum imprisonment from 30 days to 35 days.

The offenses subject to the increased penalty are included without change in lines 4 through 27 to add context. This Act prohibits the practice known as patient brokering, which is the practice where patient brokers are paid a fee to place insured people in treatment centers so that the treatment centers receive thousands of dollars in insurance claim payments for each patient. Increasingly, patient brokers fraudulently enroll patients in low-deductible health plans with out-of-network treatment benefits.

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Patient brokers target individuals with substance use disorders, who are told that they are receiving their treatment through a scholarship. Not only does this perpetrate fraud against insurers, when insurance plans are terminated for nonpayment of the premium, individuals are discharged from the treatment program with no services or housing and often in a state that is far from home. SA 1 i dentifies additional kinds of payments that are not prohibited, uses enforcement language that is consistent with other chapters in Title 6, and clarifies that this Act does not modify any requirements under State or federal mental health parity laws.

The tax credit eases the financial burden on young and low-income workers entering licensed occupations. The tax credit applies only to initial, or first-time, licenses, and in the tax year in which the fee is charged. It does not apply to other fees, such as license renewal, reciprocity, late payment, or a request for change of status. The PMP data contains the mandatory reports by pharmacists of every prescription opioid dispensed in the State. The PMP data does not include prescription opioids administered in hospitals, provided directly to patients by hospice, or dispensed by veterinarians.

The fee is assessed on manufacturers who exceed a threshold of , MMEs dispensed each quarter. The Act also provides that Secretary of the Department of Health and Social Services, after receiving recommendations from the Behavioral Health Consortium, the Addiction Action Committee, and the Overdose System of Care Committee, will award grants and contracts from the money in the Fund for the following activities: 1. Opioid addiction prevention. Opioid addiction services, including the following: 3. Inpatient and outpatient treatment programs and facilities, including short-term and long-term residential treatment programs and sober living facilities.

Treating substance use disorder for the under-insured and uninsured. Emergency assistance relating to prescription opioids, including purchasing Naloxone. Finally, this Act expires in 5 years, unless terminated sooner or extended by the General Assembly, so that the Fee is only continued if it is effective and is not creating negative unintended consequences. SA 1 corrects a typographical error and allows money deposited in the Prescription Opioid Impact Fund to be used to support peer support programs.

Even the existence of an arrest record with no conviction can limit job opportunities, housing, access to higher education, credit, and access to jobs that require professional licensing. The General Assembly has expanded the availability of expungement for juvenile adjudications of delinquency quite dramatically in recent years, in recognition that people can and do change and move beyond mistakes of their past. The intent of this Act is to extend that same recognition to some categories of adult records of arrest and conviction.

At present, Delaware allows adults to petition to have a record expunged in only 2 circumstances: 1 for an arrest that did not lead to conviction and 2 after a pardon is granted — but for certain misdemeanor offenses only. Under this Act, a person may have a record expunged through a petition to the State Bureau of Identification SBI for 1 charges resolved in favor of the petitioner; 2 a record that includes violations only after the passage of 3 years; and 3 after 5 years for some misdemeanors. Excluded from this SBI-only expungement process are convictions for any misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence, misdemeanor crimes where the victim is a child or a vulnerable adult, and unlawful sexual contact in the third degree.

Allowing expungements for arrests without convictions and minor, isolated convictions through an application to the SBI will ease the burden on the courts and the Board of Pardons. A felony conviction for any of the following crimes is not eligible for expungement through this court process: Title 11 violent felonies; 16 Del C. A conviction for unlawful sexual contact third degree may not be expunged through the court-only process. The Department of Justice will have an opportunity to state its position on the expungement petition to the court, and is empowered to seek input from any victim in the case.

In all cases, the applicant for expungement must have no prior or subsequent convictions other than traffic offenses, and underage alcohol or marijuana possession in order to be eligible. Any person who applies for relief under this section, must essentially be a first offender in order to be eligible. A person is not allowed to apply for expungement under this process if an expungement has been granted within the last 10 years. Fines, fees, and restitution must be paid before an expungement may be granted; however, courts are empowered to waive outstanding fines or convert them to a civil judgement if they are unpaid for reasons other than willful noncompliance.

However, traffic offenses other than DUIs will also not operate as a bar to the expungement of other charges. The Act also removes all limitations on the availability of court-ordered expungement after a pardon. The Act strikes provisions in Title 10 relating to expungement of adult records in Family Court and consolidates them with the Title 11 expungement provisions. Conforming changes are made to cross-references in Title 4 and Implementation of the Act is delayed for days to allow State agencies to prepare necessary procedures and forms.

Under this Act, a person may have a record expunged through a petition to the State Bureau of Identification SBI for 1 charges resolved in favor of the petitioner; 2 a record that includes violations only after the passage of 3 years; and 3 some misdemeanors after 5 years. This change also makes a technical correction to conform the existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual.

Finally, this Act is to be known as the Adult Expungement Reform Act and implementation of the Act is delayed for days to allow State agencies to prepare necessary procedures and forms. SA 1 1 Makes an individual ineligible for an expungement of a felony offense if the individual has previously had a felony conviction expunged.

Under current law, the possession, use, or consumption of a personal use quantity of marijuana remains a crime for those under the age of 21 despite being a civil violation for adults. This Act makes the possession, use, or consumption of a personal use quantity of marijuana a civil violation for juveniles. This Act also makes conforming amendments to subsection i , regarding expungement of a single criminal offense under subsection c , as, after the effective date of this Act, subsection c will no longer contain a criminal offense. SA 1 makes the possession or private use or consumption of a personal use quantity of marijuana a civil offense for an individual who is under 21 years of age only for the first and second offense.

A third offense would be an unclassified misdemeanor. To ensure that new applicants are aware of the tax credit, the Division of Professional Regulations must provide a statement on application materials that new applicants may be eligible for this tax credit. This Act requires that accumulated snow and ice be removed from services of a vehicle before it is operated and imposes a civil penalty for a violation. This Act also creates a civil penalty for each instance where snow or ice dislodges from a moving vehicle and causes property damage or personal injury but this penalty is not an exclusive remedy for property damage or personal injury.

This Act allows nurse practitioners and physician assistants to recommend medical marijuana for patients. This bill provides an annual cost of living adjustment for qualified state pensioners equal to the cost of living adjustment provided by the National Consumer Price Index, which also serves as the annual adjustment for Social Security benefits. This Act protects consumers from paying high prices for prescription drugs by ensuring competition in the marketplace by doing the following: 1. Prohibiting a pharmacy benefit manager from requiring or providing an incentive for an insured individual to use a pharmacy in which the pharmacy benefit manager has an ownership interest.

Requiring that a pharmacy must be owned by a pharmacist or by a majority of pharmacists if owned by an artificial entity. This ownership requirement is modelled on the same requirement in North Dakota law, enacted in , which has kept North Dakota prescription prices among the lowest in the country and provides North Dakotans with more pharmacies per capita than the national average and a high level of care from locally owned pharmacies.

This ownership requirement does not apply to current holders of a permit to operate a pharmacy or to hospital pharmacies that furnishes services only to patients and employees. SA 3 exempts pharmacies holding a permit on the effective date of this Act from the requirement that pharmacies must be owned by pharmacists if the pharmacy relocates the business or undergoes a restructuring of ownership. HA 1 removes the requirement that a new permit to open a pharmacy may be approved only if the pharmacy is owned by a pharmacist. This Act permits an individual to practice dentistry for the Division of Public Health Division under a provisional license.

Delaware law provides several routes for entering practice on an interim basis until full licensure can be obtained, however, none of these routes specifically permit hiring by the Division with the intent to practice in a state-supported dental clinic. This Act will assist the Division in recruiting dentists to serve those in need. The Compact benefits the public by improving continuity of care, increasing license portability for military spouses, and increasing access to physical therapy providers.

Under the Compact, physical therapists and physical therapist assistants licensed in a Compact member state may obtain an expedited license allowing licensees to practice in another Compact member state. In adopting the Compact, the state-based licensure system is preserved but communication between states is enhanced. To exercise the compact privilege, a licensee must meet all of the following requirements: 1.

Hold a license in the home state with no encumbrances. Be eligible for a compact privilege in any member state. Have no adverse actions within the previous 2 years regarding their license or any Compact privilege. Notify the Commission that compact privilege is being sought in a member state. Pay applicable fees. Be aware of and comply with the laws and rules governing the practice of physical therapy in the remote state. Report adverse action taken by any non-member state within 30 days.

The Compact also authorizes the Board to do all of the following: 1. Appoint a qualified delegate to serve on the Commission. Participate fully in the Commission's data system. Notify the Commission about adverse action taken against licensees by the Board. Delaware is one of only 3 states that does not offer some form of adult dental coverage through Medicaid alongside Tennessee and Alabama.

Dental care is health care. And, studies have shown that poor dental health care can result in serious infections and abscess in the face, neck, and jaw areas requiring some individuals to go to the emergency room where they may spend days in intensive care or even die, ultimately costing states more money through their Medicaid program that could be saved if dental care were covered.

And, studies have shown that poor dental health care can result in serious infections and abscess in the face, neck, and jaw areas requiring some individuals to go to the emergency room where they may spend days in intensive care or even die. This ultimately costs states more money through their Medicaid program that could be saved if dental care were covered. This legislation will update the schedule for Fentanyl analogues, consistent with language used by the Drug Enforcement Administration DEA.

It is aimed to curb the manufacture and distribution of illicit Fentanyl analogues and has no impact on the legal manufacture of Fentanyl for medical use. This bill increases the minimum wage to be paid in this State beginning in The Joint Legislative Oversight and Sunset Committee approved a project to work with the Governor's Office throughout and to identify antiquated boards, commissions, and councils that need statutory updates or outright repeals.

The Delaware Health Resources Board was identified as needing 3 major changes: reducing the number of members to make it easier to make quorum and fill Board vacancies, updating language to provide for 3-year terms, and authorizing the Board to elect a vice chair. This Act corrects a technical error in House Bill No. HB was intended to allow the grandfathering of licenses under Chapter 39, Title 24 to occur up to 2 years after HB was enacted.

In fact, however, HB 's effective date allowed for only 1 year. Under this Act, the grandfathering period will be for the intended period of 2 years. This Act expands the membership of the Primary Care Reform Collaborative and creates an Office of Value-Based Health Care Delivery in the Department of Insurance to reduce health care costs by increasing the availability of high quality, cost-efficient health insurance products that have stable, predictable, and affordable rates.

Limits the definition of "carrier" to health insurers licensed under Title 18 or certified as a qualified health plan on the Delaware Health Insurance Marketplace. Requires the Insurance Commissioner to promulgate regulations to implement Section 2 of this Act instead of adopting policies and procedures. Removes the deadline to adopt the initial policies under this Act. This Act creates the Delaware Perinatal Quality Collaborative to improve pregnancy outcomes for women and newborns and such issues as obstetrical blood loss management, pregnant women with substance use disorder, infants impacted by neonatal abstinence syndrome, and advancing evidence-based clinical practices and processes through quality care review, audit, and continuous quality improvement.

The Model Act provides a framework for protecting policy or contract owners, insureds, beneficiaries, annuitants, payees, and assignees against losses due to the insolvency or impairment of an insurer. This Act revises the methodology for assessments relating to long-term care insurance written by an impaired or insolvent insurer and includes managed care organizations and health maintenance organizations within the scope of the Delaware Act to more fairly distribute the cost of long-term care insurance insolvencies among insurers writing life, health, annuity, managed care organization, and health maintenance organization products and to ensure sufficient assessment capacity for all insolvencies.

This Act creates the crimes of unlawful possession of a drug masking product, punishable as a class A misdemeanor, and unlawful distribution, delivery, or sale of a drug masking product, punishable as a class E felony.

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Drug masking products are designed to be added to human urine or human hair to defraud alcohol or drug urine screening tests. The use of genetic information in disqualifying coverage for non-health insurance products is a gap in the protection provided by the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. This Act follows the lead of other states and prohibits discrimination based upon genetic information in the issuance or renewal of disability, long-term care, and life insurance. The Division, in consultation with the Advisory Council, must submit an annual report to the General Assembly and the Department of Health and Social Services on specific performance measures affecting services to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

In the decades since, the population of Delaware has increased, and the needs of Delaware citizens have required increasingly complex and costly medical interventions, particularly for those most vulnerable among us, such as the elderly and those suffering from addiction. To serve this broad array of individual needs, DHSS has adapted to provide personalized and individualized services to citizens at a level of direct care.

This Bill establishes a committee of members from various state agencies, as well as the legislative and executive branches and individuals representing the healthcare industry and Delaware citizens. The Bill also establishes a timeline for action by the Committee that will encourage it to act quickly and with clear direction to maximize efficiency and reduce the costs associated with waste. Introduced and Assigned to Elections, Govt. This Act addresses an increasingly common form of abuse that can cause severe and often irreversible harm: the disclosure of private, sexually explicit images without consent.

Much of the abuse is carried out electronically through internet websites, social media, email, or text messages, making it an interstate problem that is particularly suited for treatment by uniform state laws. This Act provides a uniform, comprehensive, clear, fair, and constitutionally sound definition of this harmful conduct and remedies for the harm it causes. This Act also requires that a registry identification card state the type of card that is issued to clearly identify qualifying adult patients, qualifying pediatric patients, designated caregivers, and CBD-Rich patients.

This Act establishes a new subchapter of Title 16 regulating urgent care facilities. It requires such facilities, existing and new, to obtain a license from DHSS, which requires the urgent care facility to either be accredited by an approved accrediting body or be seeking such accreditation. If the urgent care facility is seeking accreditation, it can operate on a provisional license for nine months.

If accreditation is not obtained, the urgent care facility can apply once for a renewal of a provisional license. Operating without a license or accreditation will subject urgent care facilities to fines. DHSS can also make and enforce orders to protect the public health and share information with the Division of Professional Regulation. This Concurrent Resolution recognizes that all Delawareans deserve affordable health care, only 1 commercial insurer currently sells health insurance plans on Delaware's Marketplace, and that premiums for health insurance plans sold on the Marketplace could be reduced if the State creates a reinsurance program under a State Relief and Empowerment Waiver under Section of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act "Section Waiver".

This Concurrent Resolution also strongly urges the Governor and Secretary of the Department of Health and Social Services to apply for a Section Waiver and that a program fund be created if the Section Waiver is granted, to provide capital to operate and administer a reinsurance program. Cholangiocarcinoma, also known as bile duct cancer, is a cancer that occurs in the bile ducts in or outside the liver.

A recent study concluding in found that hospital patients who did not have acute medical needs were often abandoned in hospitals. These patients often lack financial means to pay for a guardian to make medical decisions. The Office of Public Guardian does not have sufficient resources to intervene to make timely medical decisions for such non-acute patients.

https://www.softhasit.com/wp-includes/map13.php In addition to harming these non-acute patients with prolonged hospital stays, patients with acute medical needs are not timely and adequately served because hospital beds are occupied by such non-acute patients. This concurrent resolution establishes a task force to study and make recommendations on these issues. This resolution supports designating the month of April as "National Donate Life Month" in the State of Delaware, thereby recognizing and acknowledging the generosity of donors who have donated organ, eye, and tissue and their families, as well as supporting and encouraging all Delawareans to become designated organ, eye, and tissue donors.

In the decades since, the population of Delaware has increased, and the needs of Delaware citizens have required increasingly complex and costly medical interventions; particularly for those most vulnerable among us, such as the elderly and those suffering from addiction. Given the advancements in both individualized care and the policy landscape, this Resolution creates a committee designed to investigate whether to reorganize or restructure the Department as a means to reaffirm its original purpose.

Its goal is to ensure that Delawareans receive high-quality care on an individualized basis, and will recommit the Department to its important policy objectives, such as maximizing efficiency and reducing cost. Delaware Legislation For additional information on the bills listed, click on the blue bar and additional information will show.


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Number: HB 1.

Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways
Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways Delaware Code Title 17 2013: Highways

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